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Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Reverse Childhood & Other Ramblings

I don't own Jurassic Park. Not even VHS.

That doesn't sound like much to you, but this is a fact: Jurassic Park came out on tape October 4, 1993. Do you know how I know this? Because I had it marked on the calendar. I obsessed about it with an unhealthy fervor. I wanted to skip school that day so I could go buy it, but I eventually convinced my parents to pick me up from school so I could go get it.

I distinctly remember my mom and dad picking me up my classroom and apologizing to my teacher for me being such an irritating spaz all day. I probably disrupted the class a thousand because I just could not wait to get the movie.

So to me, it's very strange that I don't own it. I don't even know where my VHS went. It's just gone, in the magical pile of things that got lost when my parents split up. Also in that pile: my Stray Cats .45 for "Stray Cats Strut," She-Ra's horse, my TMNT Halloween costume, and my awesome Jurassic Park t-rex that had a chunk of flesh that could be removed from side for realistic battles.

I was the only fourth grader in my school that had read the complete works for Michael Crichton.  So suffice it say, I was a pretty awesome fourth grader.

I read Jaws by Benchley when I was eight.I read Terminal Man by Crichton when I was nine years old.  I read Cujo by King when I was ten, and subsequently went on to read most of Stephen King's books by the time I was twelve.

It should also be noted that I didn't start reading young adult books until I was an adult. I read anything I could get my hands when I was a kid, and I was into horror and sci-fi, I guess. So that's mostly what I read.

But I also wanted to make a point of reading books that I'd heard of - things that people talked about as classics. So I sought out Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, Jack Kerouac, Sylvia Plath, J.D. Salinger, Edgar Allen Poe, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, that guy who wrote Lolita who's name I can't remember and I'm too lazy too look up.

I read all of that stuff by the time I was sixteen. I do everything backwards, though. I didn't start getting into graphic novels and young adult books until I was in my twenties.

I grew up backwards, I think, and I like that better. It's much more fun being a kid now that I'm an adult.

And I really need to get a copy of Jurassic Park.



P. S. To all those who weighed in the Australia trip - I'm seriously looking into it. I haven't bought any tickets yet or made any official plans, but I'm in talks to get something going. Because Australia is fancy.

P. P. S. To those didn't understand my ABBA comment in the last post, it's because in the hit Australian film Muriel's Wedding, Toni Collette listens almost exclusively to ABBA, and it was my attempt at being funny. But I'm not always funny.

P. P. P. S. The Australian film Candy is actually a big inspiration for the My Blood Approves series, particularly Letters to Elise.

P. P. P. P. S. You should all listen to "My Body is a Cage" by Peter Gabriel. It's a cover of an Arcade Fire song, but I like the Peter Gabriel version better. To be fair, I love covers of songs though. They're my favorite.

98 comments:

  1. I absolutely love that you had a "Stray Cats" record. I had completely forgotten about them. I'm off to YouTube to watch the video right now!

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  2. I got cat class, and I got cat style.

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  3. I was just thinking about how much I love Jurassic Park today. Your brainwaves must have reached me.

    I also didn't read YA until I was older. This was actually because I was a little snot about it in elementary school. I read John Steinbeck because I COULD, and I figured "kid's books" were for everyone else. Harry Potter changed all of that. Now I read more YA than anything else, lol.

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  4. I agree. There was probably something snobby about me not reading YA books as a kid. I remember everyone being all crazy about Goosebumps, and I had my copy of Salem's Lot and was like, "Please. That's not scary. THIS is scary."

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  5. Parents and teachers also push kids to read "at their reading level," rather than stuff written for their age. I work in a library, and at least once a week I hear, "Johnny likes _______, but we're trying to get away from that." Hang on! Your kid is enjoying reading! Don't steal that from them.

    My high school English teacher almost wouldn't let me do book reports on anything but classics. It turned out okay for me, because I love the classics. I read Les Miserables in 7th or 8th grade, and it's still my favorite book.

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  6. Oh man, this brings back memories. I read Jurassic Park six times in elementary school, until the paperback version my parents got me had fallen apart. The last time, I counted all the swear words--I think it clocked in at 350 or something like that (mostly damn and hell, with maybe a dozen f-bombs and probably some others that I didn't recognize at the time).

    When I saw the movie, my dad got scared when the T-rex was chasing Malcolm in the car, so I turned to him and said "Dad, don't worry; the Tyrannosaurus only has a maximum running speed of 60 mph, and only for short distances." The Velociraptors, on the other hand, scared the crap out of me; I was nine years old and had to leave the movie. For the next two years I had intermittent nightmares involving Velociraptors, some of them pretty cool. Now, wherever I work as a temp, I assess each workplace for Velociraptor entry points and possible escape routes.

    After Jurassic Park, I read a ton of other Crichton stuff. My favorite was Sphere, though when I picked it up a year ago I could barely get past the first chapter. I dunno; maybe I read for different things now, and Crichton is not as strong on character development as a lot of the fantasy and science fiction I read. If the characters are all flat, I get bored fast.

    But Jurassic Park was way cool. So thanks for bringing back the memories. :)

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  7. Terminal Man was favorite Crichton. I haven't read it in years. I wanted to read a while back, but I couldn't get it on an ereader, so I forgot about it.

    I, too, always assess everything for velociraptor entry points. It's the only smart thing to do. I also check for escape routes in case zombies break in.

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  8. Ah! I thought the ABBA reference dealt with their 1977 movie "ABBA: The Movie" that was set during their Australia tour.

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  9. And here I thought I was the only one who was born an old woman and will die a girl.

    The name you're looking for is Vladimir Nabokov for Lolita.

    And this blog is such a great resource in so many ways. My reading list just got added to like way.

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  10. A girl I went to school with starred i Muriel's Wedding - love it. 'You're terrible Muriel' is a big catchphrase here :-)
    I think we have reverse childhoods in common. Bizarrely I blogged about reading Peter Benchley's Jaws aged 10 earlier this year! It freaked me out so badly I gave up swimming in the open ocean (not such a bad decision considering the size of the sharks we get here!).
    I read all kinds of books and still enjoy YA books and films - I like that they tap into the 'younger me' and help keep my levels of optimism and sense of wonder about the world topped up.

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  11. I have that Jurassic Park T-Rex with the chunk out of his side in my kid's closet right now! It was my little brother's, and it was so cool, I kept throwing it in with my things when I moved to tmy college dorms, into my own apartments, and then my house. Now my kid loves it, even if one leg has to be super-glued on every two weeks. It's a badass toy for the generations!

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  12. Peter Gabriel's cover of "My Body is a Cage" was played on the last House episode. His voice is so distinctive that my wife and I recognized that it was him almost immediately, even though we had never heard the song and certainly didn't know that Peter Gabriel had made a cover.

    Strange how things you've never encountered will all-of-a-sudden pop up more than once from independent sources.

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  13. I still remember all the stuff I lost when my parents split, and I'm forty-five years old:

    2 ponies, 3 guinea pigs, and the complete set of a really cool mystery series (much better than Nancy Drew) among a ton of other things.

    I've read in your earlier posts about people pointing out the editing of your books. Don't sweat it. Even after you get all the grammer cleaned up, you'll still get feedback about how the book should have been cut or how the book should be more accurate on some miniscule point.

    No one is ever going to put out a perfect product. Do everything you can and then turn it loose. 99% of the people will be happy with your effort, and the one percent will always be there.

    Rebecca Melvin
    In the Brief Eternal Silence
    http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/14377

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  14. Nice blog. Congrats on BON.

    Loved Muriel's Wedding

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  15. The problem I have with reading those books at such a young age is that I don't think you can fully understand what's happening at that age. Sure, you might be able to make an image in your head about what's going on, but those are great books that, in my opinion, should be understood.

    I'm not saying that you're "too young to read horror books" or "too young to read about sex", but for instance: I first read Catcher in Rye once when I was 12 years old. Holden instantly became my favorite character ever (he still is). I read it again when I was 14, 16, 18, and have probably read it a hand full of times since my twenties.

    My understanding of the book changed pretty much every time I read it. Was it because I understood reading better? Maybe. But I'm under the assumption that I understood _life_ better. I just hadn't had a chance to figure out what Holden was actually going through.

    Don't get me wrong ... you can certainly read the book(s) just to them, but it would just be tragic if you read Catcher in the Rye once when you were 12 and then don't have the true influence that you would get from reading the book when you were older.

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  16. Jurassic Park, VHS, and reading SK at a very young age...I feel 9 years old all over again! Thanks for the burst of nostalgia, Amanda! I think I even had that same t rex with the removable chunk ‘o’ flesh :D

    I also remember the stick I got from other kids for reading Crichton and King at such a young age, kids pick on the weirdest of things…’ha ha, you can read at a higher level than me!’.

    If you’re still looking for exits from zombies every time you enter a building come and offer your thoughts on my Zombie Week 2011 posts this week!

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  17. I got the complete works of Shakespeare (translated) as a birthday gift when I was in fifth grade, as I had read everything I could get my hands on by then and my parents thought that could keep me busy for a while. Now I read fashion mags and twilight series. I am glad to have found your blog, congratulations on being Blog of note.

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  18. Ślady pozostawiaj za sobą i przestań na nie spoglądać gdy szukasz tego co do szczęścia potrzebujesz.

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  19. I was the same way. I didn't read YA books until I was an adult teaching. Then later I really dove into them when I decided I wanted to write them.

    P.S. - Peter Gabriel is awesome

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  20. I just watched Jurassic Park on TV the other day :) I also agree, that when I was a teenager, I did not read YA books. Although, sometimes I wonder if they were as big of hits a few years ago as they are today. This was probably a ramble. Anyways, I'm uber jealous of your dinosaur that had a removable chunk!

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  21. She-Ra! Haha. Nice. My sister loved that show. The Princess of Power.

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  22. This is the first entry of your blog that I've read and it compelled me to give you a cyber high five.

    Muriel's Wedding, velociraptors, Steven King, Jaws, A+! My sister and I used to have the t-rex and velociraptor puppets that made sounds. I miss those things.

    I assume you read Lost World. That is the only Crichton novel that I hated (but I loved the movie). What'd you think of it?

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  24. My reading choices are similarly determined: I read what I want but also try to find things that I hear about, for one reason or another. And just by this post, I would agree that you were probably a very awesome fourth grader!

    I am following you now, by the way. :)

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  25. I was wondering about your comment that your parents split up. As someone who works with children, I am wondering how has that effected your life? Do you feel that you are a different person that you could have been?

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  26. I'm a firm believer that a good reader makes (or at least contributes to making) a good writer. Looking at the list of what you read early, its no wonder your so talented! Austen and Dostoevksy are some of my favorite classics authors, and I adore King too.

    Sarah Allen
    (my creative writing blog)

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  27. Hi amanda...
    Sou do Brasil...
    Adoreei seu site! é de mais!
    se voce não entende oque eu digitei, pode traduzir no google....
    Eu traduzi seu site...
    é muito massa...
    Espero que você goste dos meus comentários...
    Parabéns por tandos visitantes em seu blogger, espero que tenha muito mais, visite o meu, pode até ser um pouco meio sem graça, mais vale apena conferir...
    Eu concordo com o que você colocou...
    Bjos, de uma Brasileira chamada,
    Geovana....

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  28. YES! I was OBSESSED with Jurassic Park as a kid, and I didn't read YA until I was an adult for the most part either. I was heavily into classics and mystery books at around 10, then sci fi and fantasy in my early teens. Didn't discover YA until I was 18ish, and now that I'm in my mid 20's that's the majority of what I read. Maybe it's because I wanted to be grown up as a kid, and now that I'm an adult I miss being a kid?

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  29. hey,

    I found about your books a couple of days ago. Maybe it´s because I´m living in germany. It was a coincidence, that I found them.
    I would like to write a Review for your Trylle books. But the problem is, that the books are not available here now (sad but true). So had no chance to read a single of them (but the excerpts) And I read in one of your latest posts, that you offer some free books. I would be very happy, when you could send me a PDF.
    My blog is not really a bookblog, but I want to do reviews and I blog about my sketches there.
    It´s very nice, that you offer something like this^^

    When its possible my e-mail: tenshi_91@hotmail.de

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  30. I'm having a reverse childhood sort of...I was so wrapped up in forcing myself to do the corporate career thing, it took me ten years to figure out I was making myself and everyone around me miserable. Now, I stay at home and do the house husband thing. Check me out: http://teddynovak.blogspot.com

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  31. found you through blogs of note - congrats.
    I too, read King as a elementary school student - now that my daughter is that age, I think yikes! it would scare the pants off her, I guess I was brave.

    P.S. Lolita is Nabakov, and Australia is awesome, you should definitely go!

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  32. It is important for children to read things that they like. This blog entry shows that. If you never liked anything you read, you would not have remembered what your favorites were. Reading practice is reading practice, no matter what the content is.
    http://claire-onaclaireday.blogspot.com/

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  33. Great post! I too seem to live my life in reverse. Not intentionally, but even so, I never watched kids' movies when I was younger because I thought they were lame. Now I just finished watching "16 Wishes" on Disney Channel and actually found myself appreciating the message it was sending to kids.

    There's a lot of great kids stuff out these days. I think that since Harry Potter, people have started serving up more serious material to kids rather than inane goofiness or sugar sweet family stories.

    I love book series that "grow up" with the kids that read them, like how Harry Potter books became more serious and "harder" with each subsequent book. "The Hobbit" was a kids book, but "Lord of the Rings" had a very dark feel to it that really paid off I think in part due to the fact that the kids who read "The Hobbit" had grown up by the time it was released and appreciated the gravity Tolkien applied to his fantasy.

    That being said, I still love books that treat adult characters like adults. I love books that accurately reflect the world around us.

    I think kids books are starting to come around to that realization too.

    Nick
    One More Day: A Modern Ghost Story

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  34. As a teenager I read Jurassic Park before it was made into a movie. Loved the book and was super excited when it finally made it to the big screen. Opening day a group of us went to the drive-in theater in town and had one girl who drank too much and threw up everywhere. We had to leave before the movie ended. I had never been so pissed!

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  35. My copy of VHS Jurasic Park was eaten up by the VCR :(

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  36. Man you were a smart kid! Here's the deal. I will paint your house (been painting solo since 1994), trained in in 1978)if you help me get my writing,poems and such up on Amazon/Kindle. I am really really slow at the computer thing. What do you think? Danielle Notaro http://www.youtube.com/user/danpeak?feature=mhum

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  37. Nice video, thanks for sharing. Australia does sound fancy, I will love to go too:)

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  38. Oh wow! That song by Peter Gabriel is the most amazing thing I've heard in a while. Thank you for sharing.

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  39. I read my first YA when I was 29. At least I squeezed it in before 30. I feel for you over the loss of Swift Wind.

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  40. I understand about not reading YA until you were an adult. After I got into Poe in high school, it was King and every other horror author I could get my hands on. And in middle school I read romance. LOL. And now I've added YA to my TBR pile. :-D

    Will you be attending any conferences this year?

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  41. Ha ha ha. Maybe your dinosaur ate She-Ra's horse. That would solve one mystery! :D

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  42. I, too, left school to get that movie! Except my parents didn't know about it. And I still have my copy if you want to borrow it :)

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  43. *sigh* I cried after watching the movie - I LOVED it sooooo much! I got the book about the making of it and when mum finally let me read the book I was in heaven :) and then severly dissappointed they didn't use more of it in the movie ;p can't wait for Steven Speilberg's dino series to finally air :)

    The Arrival, Book 1 of the BirthRight trilogy available now

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  44. I laughed SO HARD when the lawyer was eaten. I also dreamed about dinosaurs after seeing that movie...

    I want to go to Australia for my honeymoon. I hear the heart-shaped coral reef is very romantic :)

    Shackled
    Cheat

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  45. I loved Lolita! I actually got sent to the principal's office for reading it in study hall because it was "inappropriate". The principal was going to call my parents and I told him to go ahead because I wanted to hear their reactions when he told them I was in trouble for reading a book.

    Now my daughter is seven and I am struggling to try to keep reading interesting for her when the school is doing everything in their power to make it a pain in the a**. She wants to read Twilight. Since she's seen the movie, I figured why not. It's cute to see her come home and go get it and work for hours to get through a few pages, refusing help, so that she can read something that is taboo to her classmates.

    As far as your VHS, I was at an advantage. I was out of school and working when it came out and I think I had that day off work. I remember running to wal-mart to get it as soon as I got up.

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  46. I've always made it a point to see the movie before reading the book. That way I go with a completely unbiased opinion. Unfortunately, I never got a chance to read Jurassic Park, though the movie was great.

    I started reading YA (at least I thought it was YA) when I was about fourteen. My first "YA" was by John Saul. I thought it was a young adult because the POV of the story was written from a sixteen-year-old kid. What did I know about genres back then? I just wanted a good book and Saul delivered.

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  47. Thanks for taking me back. I always wondered what happened to my rainbow brite and genuine leather ET doll. :(

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  48. When I was in elementary school, I smuggled Stephen King books into my room because I wasn't allowed to read them. The fact that they were forbidden, of course, made them even more interesting & scary...

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  49. Have you gone back to read those books now as an adult? It would be interesting to see your perspective on those works you read as a child.

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  50. I love ABBA...grew up listening to it in fact. As for Jurassic Park, I really liked the book and the movie both. I don't understand the need to "own" it though. I only read things once. No use in revisiting them as that's just a waste of time in my opinion (and is what memory is for).

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  51. Hey Amanda I am Frnd Frm India..Plz visit my blog ISHAN92.blogspot.com..

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  52. This post made my day. I share the love of Jurassic Park and my friend's one wish for his birthday last week was for us to play the theme from Jurassic Park every time he entered the room, unfortunately we couldn't find the flute, but it is on our future to do list.

    I shared the same obsession with reading and also read many of those books as a child. I chose to escape in the world of books instead of being fully social...i think it worked better that way.

    I'm adding your blog to my subscriptions and hope you will visit mine as well! http://mytaleoftriumphandsurvival.blogspot.com/

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  53. Wow you really have a love that movie, I my self have seen it but it scared the crap out me as well I was like 9 when I saw it for the first time with my parents permission at a friends house, in any case I still have a love for the movie now that I am older but I can't find it anywhere in the stores near me so I can only watch it on tv every once in a while

    Ah yes please visit my blog to hear about cool books and movies! reveiwswithviews.blogspot.com And yes I do plan on posting more than what I have.

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  54. Good blog! Is fantastic! I´m following you!

    Please, follow my blog:

    http://questoesdefutebol.blogspot.com/

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  55. Love it. While most kids were busy wanting to be firefighters, I was wanting to be a crime scene investigator. CSI was my show. I started reading "Roots" when I was 12. Never finished it, but I wanted totally understood it.

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  56. Jurassic Park was the first movie I ever saw in theaters, and absolutely loved it. For some reason or another I don't own it either. But I do watch it on tv every time it airs. I love your reading list, its quite expansive. I must say I was into goosebumps in elementary school. That changed to King and other adult books, now back to young adult. I love your books by the way, they're awesome. Look forward to reading your other works in the future.

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  57. Amy - loved the Goosebumps. Came across Welcome to Camp Nightmare in a buried box recently.

    I had JP binoculars and also owned it on VHS and DVD. Saw it recently on Blu ray. Had never seen it so clear!

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  58. You should read Vampire Kisses. I think you would really enjoy it.

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  59. Nice blog! Check out mine when you get a chance, I think you'll enjoy it!

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  60. Oi Amanda,
    Entendo que a prática da leitura é muito válida, independente da escolha do livro. É claro que alguns ficam marcados para sempre em nossa memória. Mas é fundamental incentivar essa prática. Tenho três filhos e todos adoram ler. Quando ainda não sabiam ler, eu lia para eles e agora, não dou conta do número de livros que tenho que comprar. Boa leitura para todos!
    Helck
    arteandprosa.blogspot.com

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  61. If you love Jane Austen, there is a great new Kindle Book that has absolutely EVERYTHING EVER written by Jane ... including all the stuff she wrote when she was a teen as well as newly discovered plays, poems, prayers, the whole works!

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004L62L5Q/

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  62. Congratulations on Blog of Note, that is how I found you. I must say I;m impressed with your work, and you got yourself a follower ;) Keep up your great posts!

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  63. I totally agree with Bryan Ray. It's definitely awesome to start reading those books when you're younger (I had mandatory classics reading in my 6th grade English class), but every time you revisit them, you get a new perspective. That's why, I think, even if you do things backwards (read young adult) you kind of grow up in a similar pattern as everyone else anyway. As a little kid, you want to keep up with everyone that's older, and then once you're older, you wish you could go back to when things were simpler. I know I sure do. :) I've pulled out my Junie B. Jones a couple times since going to college.

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  64. ...anything wrapped up in an Abba reference is instantly funny, so no worries.

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  65. I *love* "Salem's Lot" and I still think the scariest things I ever read were Goosebumps--although that may be mostly exaggerated in my memory by childhood terror and nightmares.

    I did the same things with books. I always tried to read my dad's scifi books when I could sneak them away long enough. But now I'm going back for the YA stuff. YA is seriously under-respected as a ... what is it? Reading level?

    P. P. P. P. S. I cannot believe any cover of an Arcade Fire song could be better than the original, but I'll give it a trial.

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  66. Nabakov. Vladimir Nabakov.
    (I'm sure somebody else has mentioned it). It's funny, I think about that book alot. On many levels I think it is more frightening than anything Stephen King ever wrote.
    I think it's brilliant that you have grown up backwards. You will make an awesome mom! (Should you ever be so inclined)

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  67. Is it bad to say I've never seen Jurassic Park? I just never got into those movies..

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  68. Glad I found your blog! There's a news story floating around facebook about your writing. Fantastic fun!

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  69. My God I haven't heard a song by Peter Gabriel in FOREVER. Love him. He used to be the man!

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  70. Amanda,
    I can't believe I am reading your blog! In the past several weeks, I have read two articles about your. You are a winner! You've inspired thousands to self publish! Congrats on being named a blog of note. Much deserved! If you have a moment, check out my A Camp Host's Meanderings blog at http://levonnegaddy.com

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  71. My parents have been planning in case our stock market crashes again so we have like food stores in case of inflation. It was embarrassing to me at first but now I pretend we are preparing for the zombie apocalypse
    Thought you would appreciate that
    Now for more valuable cara lee thoughts you should write like 50 more books in like the next few months
    I'm a big fan
    Good day

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  72. I think my reading taste were a little backwards too. I didn't start reading YA novels until my kids became teenagers. I read it to make sure I knew what they were reading.

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  73. "I distinctly remember my mom and dad ***picking me up my classroom.***"

    You forgot the word IN, Ms. Millionaire.

    I see you're playing Queenmaker with a few writers now.

    Meet the new boss; same as the old boss.

    If you were male, I bet you would have sold maybe 0.0001 percent of what you sell now. Try putting something out as a male writer if you want to prove me right.

    Nothing wrong with someone getting rich as a writer, but language errors suggest that perhaps it wasn't language skill that was the deciding factor here.

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  74. Jurassic Park was one of my favorite movies. And I also feel that I read more adult books as a teen and more YA books as an adult. That's because high school made me read a ton of those classics, and I hardly had any time for other books. =P
    - Nicholas

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  75. Jurassic Park was one of the first DVDs I played through my, then, new surround sound system. The sound was awesome, far better than at the cinema.

    I remember one of our cats, McG, was sleeping on my knee….. until the part where the T.Rex stared stomping through the forest and the water was shaking in the puddle. I swear (shit! ….see told you) that McG took off vertically, taking my flesh and jeans with him, (aaarrrgghhh, that really hurt and I’m grateful to this day that he was not further up my lap…..) it was more like a velociraptor attack than a T.Rex one (I could tell because still had my head) but that certainly left its mark on both my mind and body.

    These days both our cats are far more streetwise, even though I have ramped up the power with a digital amp and a bigger sub woofer – our couch actually vibrates during really intense action - neither of our cats barely even bat a eyelid anymore, even during epic battle scenes…..On the other hand they might not be as cool as I think and deafness has set in with old age or is it far too many action movies....

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  76. I have to say you are such an amazing woman/girl/woman/girl - whatever, your awesome. I appreciate your perspective about many things and loved Muriel's Wedding and will have to watch it again. Whenever I hear the group ABBA I cannot help but think of ABBA inspired musical MaMa Mia and Colin Firth's hilarious remark in 60 minutes interview remarking that in the end of the movie musical - putting on mascara and dancing on stage and he was in heaven. Keep up the great work! My faith is in young people - fresh, out of the conventional box thinkers!! Amanda thank you!

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  77. I read scarface in grade 7 I dont know if you have but its a really that I enjoyed good book.

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  78. I read tons of Adult books when I was a child. It made for a much better adult-hood (besides what my mom always told me...)

    check out my blog if you want to :)

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  79. http://jackcuthbert.blogspot.com/

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  80. Alas, our stupid library had a policy about kids reading adult books, so I didn't crack into that market until I was 13 and got my mom to sign off on an adult library card.
    Little did she know! mwhahahaha I think I read a healthy mix of adult and young adult books as a kid. When I was a teenager I left YA almost completely (with few exceptions). Then I went to college and I went right back to YA and juvenile fiction.
    Wonder why we do that? Because we want the magic we can't have back?

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  81. My friend, I found a website to make big money online.
    There is address: http://bux4ad.com/_7c710168.htm

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  82. Great post. I find myself partial to coversongs aswell. Nice choice with My Body is a Cage, never heard that before. thanks

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  83. Peter Gabriel is one of my favorite musical artists. Some of his songs are in the Myst video game series. In Myst 4: Revelations they play his song as you go on a spiritual journey, and I remembered how it really added to the quality of the game. I read Jurassic Park when I was in the 7th grade. I enjoyed it a lot, but I was disappointed in the movie though. The movie differs from the book in certain ways that would have made a great movie had they stayed faithful to the book. Have you ever seen the movie Congo or Sphere?

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  84. Amanda do you mind following my blog I don't mean to spam but I'm 11 so like I followed and it's new and please share it worldofgreendreams.blogspot.com

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  85. اسلام عليكم ورحمة الله وبركاته احب ان اثني بعجابي لجميع الاصدقاء واتمنا لهم الحب والحنان احبائي الاعزاء انا من الذين السعون في الارض للرزق

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  86. Jurassic Park is my all-time favourite childhood movie! And I love Michael Crichton books, my personal favourite is Prey, such a good page turner, read it within a few days (which is not at all like me!). I love the blog by the way, take a look at mine if you like; thisisjoshuaa.blogspot.com :)

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  87. www.lafamiliaamorfaroxygonza.blogspot.com

    Entren y comenten porfavor!!! gracias a los que lo hagan!!!!!

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  88. I have some seriously fond memories of Jurassic Park, and being so excited to read the book when it came out. I also remember reading Lost World, and really not digging it as much.

    But, I read EVERYTHING growing up. It just did not matter. If I could get my hot little hands on a book, comic book, newspaper, or magazine I would read it. Still do.

    And still love my JP. And Back to the Future. Both are on my desert island lists.

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  89. Hey Mate
    FYI is pronounced Straya.

    Cheers

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  90. Wow, memories! Jurassic Park was potentially the most petrifying thing I'd ever seen when it came out in theaters (my poor five-year-old sister had nightmares for weeks - but still, thank God for parents who are happy to let their kids self-terrify with reckless abandon), and I absolutely loved it! And every other thing you listed in this post, practically. Like a journey back in time...

    Also, digging your book montage! You have impeccable taste. Keep up the fantastic work.

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  91. Ours lives mirror each other. Can't put King down, but it's Crichton that's my favorite. I am backward though, I read the books then see the movies. I usually love Crichton movies with the exception of "Congo", piss poor. I stopped doing that a couple years ago. I've heard it reported that a Crichton book will be out in about 2 years then I guess that's it. Rest in Peace Micheal. One of my favorite musicians is Peter Gabriel. Started listening to him while in Genesis. Here's the biggie, I've never read or seen or had a desire for Jurassic Park and I don't know why. Nice blog.

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  92. Wow, I read these comments and I feel positively ancient. :)

    You're so right, it's much more fun being a kid as an adult. The folks who do it the other way 'round are the ones who turn out to be old fuddy-duddies in a rocking chair, complaining about the world and everything in it.

    When I was a kid back in the day, adults didn't hover over kids like they do today, which generally gave kids a lot more freedom of choice in what they read. My folks never really kept tabs on what I read- the thought was that a kid reading a book was a good thing, period. Makes we feel sad for those growing up now- so many parents and teachers feel they have to censor everything for kids. That's okay for younger kids, but people need to realize that exposing young people to diverse ideas isn't something to be feared.

    Read on!

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  93. So have you started reading Nancy Drew mysteries yet, or is that next? ;)

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  94. ahaha. I totally had that T-rex toy. *sigh* I don't know what happened to all my old toys once I moved out of my parents house and they moved...

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